Russell Brand Says Don’t Vote. What’s His Beef?

Russell Brand set off a fire storm when in an interview with Newsnight host editor Jeremy Paxman he encouraged the British electorate not to vote. Brand endorsed a system based on the ‘massive redistribution of wealth’ to replace the status quo.

What do you think? Does his take on the British political system apply to America? Do we also have a massive problem with wealth distribution? Or is Russell Brand full of it?

Russell Brand
Russell Brand, Comedian and Activist.

From Wikipedia:

Russell Edward Brand[7] (born 4 June 1975)[8] is an English comedian, actor, radio host, author, and activist.

In 2004, Brand achieved notoriety as the host of Big Brother’s Big Mouth, a Big Brother spin-off. In 2007, he had his first major film role in St Trinian’s. In 2008, he had a major role in Forgetting Sarah Marshall; the film led to him starring in the spinoff Get Him to the Greek in 2010. He also worked as a voice actor in the animated films Despicable Me in 2010, Hop in 2011, and Despicable Me 2 in 2013. He played the title character of the 2011 remake Arthur.

Brand has received significant media coverage for controversies such as his dismissal from MTV, his behaviour as a presenter at various award ceremonies, and his drug use. In 2008, he resigned from the BBC following prank calls he made to actor Andrew Sachs on The Russell Brand Show. He has incorporated his drug use, alcoholism, and promiscuity into his comedic material.

Since guest editing an edition of the New Statesman, a British weekly magazine, Brand has become increasingly active politically. This includes a widely publicised interview with Newsnight host editor Jeremy Paxman, in which he encouraged the British electorate not to vote and endorsed a system based on the ‘massive redistribution of wealth’ to replace the status quo.

Russell Brand Unloads on Politicians. Is He Right?

Russell Brand May Have Started a Revolution Last Night

By Neetzan Zimmerman

Russell Brand talks about how the present system of democracy has failed the people and income inequality has never been greater. Watch the interview to see an impassioned Fire Brand.

The revolution itself may not be televised, but on last night’s edition of the BBC’s Newsnight, viewers may have witnessed the start of one.
Actor-slash-comedian-slash-Messiah Russell Brand, in his capacity as guest editor of the New Statesman’s just-published revolution-themed issue, was invited to explain to Jeremy Paxman why anyone should listen to a man who has never voted in his life.

“I don’t get my authority from this preexisting paradigm which is quite narrow and only serves a few people,” Russell responded. “I look elsewhere for alternatives that might be of service to humanity.”

And with that, the first shots of Russell’s revolutionary interview were fired.

Over the course of the following ten-or-so minutes, Brand and Paxo volleyed back and forth over subjects ranging from political apathy, to corporate greed, to gorgeous beards.

Throughout the interview, Brand repeatedly dodged Paxman’s efforts to trivialize his message — at one point Paxman literally called Brand a “very trivial man” — until finally, even the entrenched newsman appeared to relent against the rushing tide of Brand’s valid arguments.

After Brand reminded Paxman that he cried after learning that his grandma too had been “fucked over” by aristocrats, the Newsnight host was stunned into silence.

“If we can engage that feeling and change things, why wouldn’t we?” Brand crescendoed. “Why is that naive? Why is that not my right because I’m an ‘actor’? I’ve taken the right. I don’t need the right from you. I don’t need the right from anybody. I’m taking it.”

Video via BBC Newsnight