Preliminary Studies Indicate Under Certain Conditions Ebola is Aerostable

Is the government telling us all it knows about the Ebola virus? Does it really understand the disease? A PDF published by the DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY indicates much remains to be known  about the current strain of Ebola. The information below comes from a.gov website. In public announcements it looks like information is being withheld from the public. The reasons are understandable. The government wants to avoid panic and wants to appear to have Ebola under control. This may have short term benefits but could have disastrous long term consequences. The more we understand about Ebola the better we can take steps to avoid infection.

DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY
BROAD AGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT
HDTRA1-15-EBOLA-BAA

Under item 2.2.4. “Ebola is aerostable in an enclosed controlled system in the dark and can
survive for long periods in different liquid media and can also be recovered from plastic and
glass surfaces at low temperatures for over 3 weeks.”

Source: Ebola Characterization  (Once on page download PDF file HDTRA1-15-Ebola-BAA at top right)

2.2.4. Ebola Characterization
The means by which Ebola virus is maintained in nature remains unclear. One reservoir of this zoonotic pathogen is believed to be in bats, but it is unknown what other natural reservoirs exist. Distinct Ebola viral sequences have been identified in infected but healthy mice and shrews. (Pourrut et al., 2005) indicating there may be other unknown reservoirs.

Ebola
Ebola Virus

A better understanding of Ebola persistence under a variety of environmental conditions may help us identify other possible reservoirs and hosts to research reservoirs and other modes of transmission.

While current science indicates the disease can only be transmitted by contact with contaminated body
fluids, it remains unclear if other transmission modes are feasible. Filoviruses are able to infect
via the respiratory route and are lethal at very low doses in experimental animal models, however
the infectious dose is unknown. There is minimal information on how well filoviruses survive
within aerosolized particles, and in certain media like the biofilm of sewage systems.

Preliminary studies indicate that Ebola is aerostable in an enclosed controlled system in the dark and can survive for long periods in different liquid media and can also be recovered from plastic and glass surfaces at low temperatures for over 3 weeks (Piercy, et al., 2010).